You are here

First Public Meeting of Cross-Sector HIV Cure Project

June 19, 2014
MHRP’s Dr. Jintanat Ananworanich presented at the meeting and serves on the steering committee for this Forum project. She presented a case study on VRCO1 and analytical treatment interruption in early/acutely-infected patients.

The Forum for Collaborative HIV Research convened the first public meeting on June 17 of the Forum HIV Cure Project: Focus on Regulatory Issues, a multi-stakeholder project that involves expert working groups and engagement with the broader HIV community to address emerging scientific and regulatory hurdles in HIV cure research.

The all-day meeting showcased the work of more than 100 experts from academia, federal and regulatory agencies, government research agencies, pharmaceutical and biotech industry, and patient advocacy community who have worked together over the past several months to prepare draft consensus recommendations on how to address the regulatory issues around HIV cure research.

MHRP’s Dr. Jintanat Ananworanich presented at the meeting and serves on the steering committee for this Forum project. She presented a case study on VRCO1 and analytical treatment interruption in early/acutely-infected patients. These clinical research studies will take place in Thailand and are still in the planning phases. 

Bringing all the key players – industry, academics, regulators, and the HIV community – into one room is essential for the advancement of cure research,” said Veronica Miller, Ph.D., Director of the Forum for Collaborative HIV Research (the Forum) and co-chair of the project’s steering committee. “A dedicated space for ongoing dialogue in a neutral and independent setting provides the necessary framework for consensus on issues such as definitions, management of benefit-risk, and ensuring fair and ethical patient recruitment processes, to evolve in real-time. It allows the science and regulatory guidance to evolve hand-in-hand.”

“This is a unique opportunity to work collaboratively on strategies that could change the very nature of a disease whose name has too often been synonymous with stigma, grief, marginalization and discrimination,” said Mark Harrington, Executive Director of Treatment Action Group and a member of the Forum HIV Cure Project’s steering committee. “A framework for sorting out the regulatory issues is a prerequisite for public and private commitment to this area of research.”